Arts 162 results

Reviews of fine art, classical and opera music, and all things cultured

4Score

Never Look Away all about the red, white and blur

Movie review: Never Look Away Oscar winner Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck’s latest film is a fictional epic inspired by German painter Gerhard Richter’s early career in the East, but it captures the contours of human truth by pulling us through pigments of pain with a creative brush.  

Welsh movies — yes, and there are a lot of them — come to Ottawa

By Jay Stone   OTTAWA — The most famous Welsh film ever made is probably How Green Was My Valley, the sentimental 1941 portrait of a growing up in coal mining town that was directed by American-born John Ford and starred Walter Pidgeon, the pride of St. John, New Brunswick, and Maureen O’Hara from Dublin. Everyone in the movie spoke English with an Irish accent. It was, however, filmed in Wales.   How Green Was My Valley — which won the Best Picture Oscar that year, beating Citizen Kane — was just one of many movies throughout the years that have been set, or sometimes just filmed, in Wales. Even more have featured Welsh-born actors: the country has contributed a mighty roster of stars to the world cinema, including Richard Burton, Anthony Hopkins, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Ray Milland and a current Oscar nominee, Christian Bale.   But there’s another Welsh movie industry as well, that tells stories of the country, often in the Welsh language. ...
3.5 Score

LEGO Movie 2 misses magical click but still sticks

Movie Review: The LEGO Movie 2  - The Second Part The absurdist edge and creative intelligence that made the first LEGO movie a masterpiece is eclipsed by shallow self-awareness and plastic brick branding, but the Second Part still builds a world of enchantment by piecing together sibling rivalries with heart.
1Score

The pain of Glass

Movie review: Glass M. Night Shyamalan’s latest is a self-conscious collage of comic book form and personal conceit that talks down to the viewer as the director congratulates himself.

How Bao’s house of women brought new dimensions to Pixar animation

#OscarCheck2018 Interview - Bao Filmmakers Domee Shi and Becky Nieman-Cobb The Oscar nominations come out January 22 and Canadian director Domee Shi is already on the shortlist with Bao. She can’t talk about the Academy Awards, but the Toronto-raised animator says just making the short at Pixar feels like a victory.
3Score

The Upside has Hart, art, and good intentions but lacks dramatic clash

Movie Review: The Upside American remake of French hit Les Intouchables removes rudeness from the equation and comes up short on conflict, leaving a well-set table that misses the essential mess of life.
3.5Score

Widows buries thriller formula and finds female power

#OscarCheck2018 Movie Review - Widows Steve McQueen's follow-up to 12 Years a Slave is a female-driven heist film based on a beloved British TV series. For most directors, making a genre thriller would put them out of Oscar contention. But the award-winning McQueen isn’t your average director, and in the wake of #MeToo,  Widows could still blow things wide open.

Top Ten Movies of 2018

Movies: Top Ten Movies 2018 Black Panther changed Hollywood for the better to earn top spot on 2018’s list, but storytellers sought to pry our weary eyes open and see past preconceptions through a broad range of protagonists that transcended expectation.
3.5Score

Anthropocene: The Human Epoch-alypse

Movie review - Anthropocene: The Human Epoch Baichwal, Burtynsky and de Pencier are back with another gorgeously lensed documentary that almost comes too close to redeeming human ugliness through photographic acts of beauty.

Folking things up made for summer’s bright spot

Music: The Vancouver Folk Festival 2018 We celebrate the summer that was with a fond look back at what proved to be the highlight of Vancouver's smokiest season ever: A fully reinvented Folk Music Festival featuring acts that rocked, rattled and rolled young and old alike. By Rod Mickleburgh The line-up was skimpier than past years. Sunday clashed with the final of a riveting, month-long World Cup and the sun was hot enough to boil a monkey’s bum, but once again, the Vancouver Folk Music Festival cast its magic over me and thousands of other attendees with its annual mix of good vibes, a setting to die for and outstanding music. Even at my increasingly creaky and cranky advanced age, I found myself dancing, most notably at a wonderful, spirited workshop jam session involving Little Miss Higgins, Les Poules à Collin and Petunia & the Vipers. Thankfully, there were no cameras in sight, and the young people politely refrained from giggling. There were other highlights: ...