Movie Reviews 331 results

Jay Stone and Katherine Monk. Definitive reviews. Trusted critics.


Movie review: Happy End is Haneke at his most elusive

Movie review: Happy End The story of an unhappy French family follows the director's usual pattern of dysfunction and brutal motives, but there's not much to keep us watching

Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool Resurrects Tinseltown’s Golden Aged

Movie review: Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool Annette Bening pours pathos into a champagne glass as Gloria Grahame in Paul McGuigan's moody portrait of the feminine mystique and its martyrdom at the grabby hands of Hollywood  

War, Disasters and Quiet Passions: Jay Stone’s Top Ten Movies of 2017

Movies: Top Ten 2017 Greta Gerwig's coming-of-age gem, Lady Bird, garners big Stone praise amid a cluster of small diamonds about outsiders, loss and the elusive power of hope By Jay Stone Lady Bird: Pretty well the best time I had at the movies this year came from this small, exquisitely observed story that we’ve seen a million times: a young woman comes of age in a small town, fights with her parents and dreams of glory in the big city. But writer/director Greta Gerwig — drawing on her own life — turns this familiar material into a sweet, caustic, and authentic tale of growing up, aided by great performances from Laurie Metcalfe as the exasperated mother and Saoirse Ronan as the complicated young woman. A true gem. The Florida Project: Filmmaker Sean Baker takes a step up from his previous movie (Tangerine, which was shot on an iPhone) but doesn’t sacrifice any of the grit in the story of people living on the edge of the American dream, in every sense: they ...

In the Fade Rubs Out Boundaries of Moral Behaviour

Movie Review: In the Fade Diane Kruger won best acting honours at Cannes for good reason: her performance as a grieving mother and widow in the wake of a terrorist attack takes us from a noble quest for justice to the cellar of revenge

Maze Runner Loses Route in Frantic Final Chapter

Maze Runner: The Death Cure Dylan O'Brien returns as Thomas, a talented and genetically gifted teenager who leads a renegade group of kids looking to overthrow the wicked world of grown-ups in this final chapter of James Dashner's saga.

Den of Thieves Leaves a Manly Stink

Movie Review: Den of Thieves Testosterone fuels this bank heist vehicle as Gerard Butler plays a tough, self-loathing cop who sacrificed his inner goodness to catch the bad guys

The Post Delivers Big Message Sans Emotional Stamp

Movie review: The Post Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep play second fiddle to a 7,000-page stack of paper and an old Xerox machine in Steven Spielberg's well-intentioned history lesson about lying Presidents

Small Wins, Big Tanks: Top Ten Movies of 2017

Movies: Top Ten Films of 2017 Film critic Katherine Monk looks back on a year without frontrunners or favourites, making 2017's top choices a truly personal matter with I, Tonya, Icarus and Wonder Woman landing on the podium, and plenty of other worthy contenders in the race. By Katherine Monk It seems the President and Harvey Weinstein eclipsed the klieg lights of the entertainment world: There is no artistic standout, nor crowd-pleasing frontrunner in the race for this year’s movie laurels as the recent Golden Globe ceremony proved. The five major awards were handed out to four films. No Moonlight. No Lala Land. Not even a Hidden Figures. The year 2017 will be remembered for the last-minute resuscitation at the box-office thanks to Star Wars’s enduring shock paddles, pulling a loser year into so-so territory in the home stretch with more than half a billion in receipts for The Last Jedi. Nonetheless, revenues were down 2.7 per cent ($11 billion US) over 2016’s ...

I, Tonya Has a Triple Axel to Grind

Movie review: I, Tonya Margot Robbie goes for the gold as disgraced figure skater Tonya Harding in Craig Gillespie's dazzling ode to dysfunction that captures the early daze of reality-based entertainment

Wonder Wheel A Troubled Retread of 20th Century Trailblazers

Movie review: Wonder Wheel Woody Allen's direction is just plain wooden as he hands the dramatic tray to Kate Winslet, forcing her to serve up a bland meatloaf formed from F. Scott Fitzgerald scraps and Tennessee Williams's vulnerable female gristle