Movie Reviews 359 results

Jay Stone and Katherine Monk. Definitive reviews. Trusted critics.

2Score

Movie review: Being Canadian a trip of cliches

Documentary that examines myths about Canada ends up creating as many stereotypes as it tries to explode, writes Jay Stone
3.5Score

Movie review: Testament of Youth tells age-old truth

Alicia Vikander finds the fire-hardened spirit of noted pacifist Vera Brittain in a sentimental take on Testament of Youth, the bestselling classic about the endless tragedy of war      
4Score

Movie review: Inside Out a happy head trip

Disney Pixar takes a long walk down an infinite pier of personal identity in Inside Out, an animated tour of developmental psychology that captures the pain of growing up using primary colours and Amy Poehler's voice
3 1/2 Score

Movie review: Me and Earl and the Dying Girl is metamoving

This movie about a teenager with cancer is partly about movies about teenagers with cancer, writes Jay Stone
3Score

Movie review: Another Brilliant Young Mind

It's another film about a brilliant and troubled math genius looking for love — and it finds the same irrational number
3.5Score

Movie review: Jurassic World turns park dark

Director Colin Trevorrow tries to fill dinosaur-sized shoes with digital science and a bigger scope in his next-generation take on the $800-million Jurassic franchise  
3.5Score

Movie review: Phoenix a post-Nazi drama of identity

German actress Nina Hoss gives a fascinating performance as a woman who returns from a death camp to find her true love — and her own persona, writes Jay Stone  
4Score

Movie review: Love & Mercy finds harmony of a troubled genius

Paul Dano and John Cusack both play Brian Wilson in a creative musical biography that looks inside the head of the Beach Boys' Brian Wilson   - 30 -
2Score

Movie review: Aloft is a New Age head-scratcher

A woman seeks spiritual healing, a boy who trains falcons seeks his mother, and viewers seek some kind of meaning in Canadian drama   - 30 -    
3.5Score

Movie review: Spy shakes up sexist tropes to serve dry comic martini

Melissa McCarthy takes a character who typically blends into the background and makes her visible, forcing us to see the inherently sexist tropes of the super spy genre, writes Katherine Monk