Books 9 results
3.5Score

A Superhero Sans Pants

Movie Review: Captain Underpants Who cares about London or France when you've got a superhero rocking underpants? Dav Pilkey's potty-obsessed character makes a memorable debut with as much fart as he has heart
3.5Score

Sense of an Ending eludes closure

Movie Review: The Sense of an Ending In the film version of the ambiguous Julian Barnes novel, Jim Broadbent shines as an older man whose quiet life is interrupted by a letter that makes him re-evaluate the past
3.5Score

Inferno: To Hell and Back

Movie review: Inferno Tom Hanks and Felicity Jones get lost in a sea of attractive scenery and classical references in Ron Howard's decryption of Dante's Divine Comedy

Penetrating Helen Gurley Brown

Books: Not Pretty Enough - The Unlikely Triumph of Helen Gurley Brown New biography of the woman who recreated Cosmopolitan as a vehicle of sexual empowerment reveals lifelong insecurities and a penchant for moisturizing with baking lard

Paul McCartney biography blows up Beatles lore

Book Review: Paul McCartney: The Life by Philip Norman When Philip Norman first wrote about The Beatles in his 1981 book Shout, he earned Paul's wrath by claiming John Lennon was "three-quarters" of the band, but 25 years later he sets the creative record straight by hailing Paul as the boundary-breaking Beatle

Big Time, Small Talk, Woodstock

Book Review: Small Town Talk Barney Hoskyns is the leading chronicler of the Woodstock generation and he explores the lasting legacy of a mindset birthed in mud-covered love in his new book, Small Town Talk

David Bezmozgis dives into Russian diaspora

Interview: David Bezmozgis on Natasha The Toronto-based writer-director grew up in a community of Russian Jews who left the Soviet Union, but decades later he says the "Russian immigrant experience" has become more difficult to define -- yet far more interesting to explore through drama By Katherine Monk The “immigrant experience” is a phrase that’s been getting a lot of media mileage in the wake of Syria’s collapse and continuing mass displacement due to climate change, but as a phrase, it’s generic. It assumes all immigrants share a similar reality: a sense of exile and limited expression until assimilation takes hold. Toronto author and filmmaker David Bezmozgis thinks the North American “immigrant community” deserves better than a broad label between quotation marks, so he wrote a short story called Natasha, originally published in Harper’s before appearing in a bound collection in 2004. A Lolita-like yarn about a sexy young Russian girl who moves ...

Pop This! Patti Smith’s M Train

Podcast: Pop This! The pop culture savants are bowled over with emotion as they crack the spine of Patti Smith's latest book about 'grief, coffee and travel' in their first-ever book club episode  

The Man Who Mistook his Life for a Notebook

Books A cartoonist confesses to an Oliver Sacks obsession that has him flexing his mental muscles in way he never thought possible By Alan King I have a confession to make. I’ve read just about every word Oliver Sacks ever wrote and, God knows, the man wrote a lot. Yes, I know it sounds like an unhealthy interest in medical literature — borderline OCD. But it’s not like I’ve read all of Sherwin Nolan or Jerome Groopman or Atul Gawande — just Sacks. I read him endlessly, page after fascinating page. You could think of it as a mental disorder or a ‘cerebral deficit’ if you like. My doctor certainly does. In fact he has a name for it: florid non-sackistic verbo-dysplasia. It’s a rare, somewhat  disabling affliction. There are maybe 50 people on the planet who have it and sufferers typically live only on beautiful, faraway tropical islands, hilltop Tuscan villages or have been institutionalized for decades without ever seeing the outside world. I’m one ...