Comedy 28 results
3.5Score

Booksmart turns the page on teen girl stereotypes

Movie Review: Booksmart Olivia Wilde’s feature debut looks at coming-of-age formula through a distinctly female lens, where acceptance and affirmation don’t rely on stunts or smashing a beer can into your forehead -- but the enduring loyalty of a best friend.
3.5Score

Isn’t It Romantic? feels like a rhetorical question

Movie review: Isn’t It Romantic? Rebel Wilson leads a revolutionary effort through the red taffeta jungle of rom-coms, but fails to topple the upper tier of icing-covered couple expectations. And that’s probably just the way we want it. “Somewhere deep down, we crave a fairy tale ending for a relatable character — just as we do for ourselves,” writes movie critic Katherine Monk.
4Score

Can You Ever Forgive Me? finds redemption in unsympathetic Israel

Movie Review: Can You Ever Forgive Me? McCarthy finds a morose incandescence in the conflicted and largely loathsome character of author Lee Israel, allowing the viewer to push past ribbons of inky deception and see a woman who felt wronged by the literary clique.
3.5Score

Crazy Rich Asians takes rom-com for a luxury ride

Movie review: Crazy Rich Asians Jon M. Chu’s adaptation of the Kevin Kwan bestseller proves money trumps ethnicity and genre is universal as we watch a Romeo and Juliet romance unravel in the middle of Singapore.
2.5Score

Dog Days lifts a leg on Hollywood hydrant

Movie review: Dog Days A fluffy version of Crash for canines features the lives and leashes of various Angelenos intertwining, without once pausing to smell its own assumptions.
2Score

The Spy Who Dumped Me: Somebody Dumped Something

Movie Review: The Spy Who Dumped Me Mila Kunis and Kate McKinnon’s star in the cinematic equivalent of a girl turd - a predictably offensive but innately apologetic piece of digested genre that's almost funny, until you realize it stinks.

Eisha Marjara Finally Finds a Sense of Belonging in Outsider Stance

Interview: Eisha Marjara Venus is a new transgender comedy that finds new curves thanks to the veteran director’s elusive quest for belonging, and an internalized sense of misogyny that helped her understand the negative effects of gender dysphoria.  
3Score

Melissa McCarthy and Maya Rudolph May Be the Best Boobs in the Business

Movie Review: Life of the Party Taking on the part of a middle-aged mom who goes back to school, McCarthy revisits college comedy tropes with a seductive brand of physical comedy and an empathetic edge. Not all the comic concoctions work, but the female perspective makes room for affirmation amid humiliation.
3.5Score

Hey, Gringo! This One Is For You!

Movie review: Gringo Nash Edgerton's dark comedy features David Oyelowo as a hapless businessman struggling to stay alive in Mexico after a botched kidnapping, a bad drug deal and festering marital issues leave him deliriously endangered.

The Motive Moves in Mysterious Ways

Movies: TIFF17 Capsule Reviews Javier Gutierrez stars as a notary struggling to write the great novel without success until he starts eavesdropping on his neighbours in Manuel Martin Cuenca's darkly comic exploration of the writerly quest By Katherine Monk The writerly process is a running theme here at the Toronto International Film Festival. Darren Aronofsky’s mother! and Haifaa Al Mansour’s Mary Shellery may be the headliners, but hiding in the background is a little film called The Motive (El Autor), a Spanish film about a notary struggling to write the great novel. A dark comedy that has an ability to offer a string of surprises out of left field, The Motive stars Javier Gutierrez as Alvaro, the number cruncher with great expectations. He lives in a beautiful flat in Seville with his wife (Maria Leon) — a sexy and successful writer in her own right. Everyone loves her work, but Alvaro thinks she writes crowd-pleasing pap. He craves substance — writing with real ...