Movie reviews 58 results
2.5Score

Only Living Boy in New York Only Halfway There

Movie Review: The Only Living Boy in New York Marc Webb returns to the world of oddball romance in an underwhelming Woody Allen wannabe that features a dependable A-list cast including Jeff Bridges, Pierce Brosnan, Cynthia Nixon and Kate Beckinsale
3.5Score

The Search for Self in a Selfie Generation

Movie Review: Ingrid Goes West Aubrey Plaza brings pathos, humour and cringe-worthy authenticity to Matt Spicer's movie about a young woman seeking personal validation from social media
2Score

A Moral Argument Reduced to Meh

Movie Review: The Hitman’s Bodyguard Ryan Reynolds and Samuel L. Jackson exchange character clichés in a lazy thriller that misses the mark, aiming for moral high ground under a stack of corpses  
3.5Score

Coogan and Brydon Trip the Food Fantastic

Movie review: The Trip to Spain The third instalment in Michael Winterbottom's accidental series offers a sustained exploration of male friendships, plus a razor sharp satire of Mick Jagger
3.5Score

13 Minutes Resets Time-Bomb of Fascism

Movie Review: 13 Minutes Oliver Hirschbiegel returns to the land of the brown shirts to extract another timely lesson about the role of the individual in this detailed portrait of the man who nearly assassinated Adolf Hitler
3Score

Atomic Blonde Blasts the Past

Movie Review: Atomic Blonde Charlize Theron kicks plenty of ass as a Cold War-era spy born from a nostalgic graphic novel, but David Leitch sacrifices coherence on the altar of non-stop action -- which turns out to be a fitting salute to the era.
2Score

Dunkirk Doesn’t Work

Movie Review: Dunkirk Christopher Nolan's war movie about the 'miracle' at Dunkirk fights itself on the beaches, in the air and on the seas; it never surrenders a strand of storyline in its desire to go big.  
4Score

The Big Sick Proves a Salve to the Soul

Movie Review: The Big Sick Rom-com meets Romeo and Juliet in Kumail Nanjiani's truth-inspired story that follows our lovesick hero down hospital corridors to face life, death and family

Trish Dolman directs the national selfie: Canada in a Day

Interview: Trish Dolman Vancouver filmmaker Trish Dolman captures Canadian soul in crowd-sourced documentary portrait airing tonight on CTV By Katherine Monk (July 1, 2017) VANCOUVER — There is something extraordinarily moving about Canada in a Day, even though one might say it’s thoroughly ordinary. A visual scrapbook pulled together from over 16,000 video submissions from average Canucks who pointed the camera at their own lives on September 10, 2016, this selfie collage isn’t a film made by the rich and famous. It wasn’t scripted, and contains no professional actors. Yet, there is drama. There’s a palpable sense of theme. And despite the diversity of the players and their unique messages, one even feels a sense of unity. A shared heartbeat echoing empathy and human understanding. It’s lurking in every frame, because it’s part of who we are as a people. It’s also because of Trish Dolman, the Vancouver-based producer and director who took on the challe...
2.5Score

47 Meters Down Too Shallow

Movie review: 47 Meters Down Mandy Moore and Claire Holt play potential shark chum in another girl-versus-shark showdown that makes us care more about sharks than selfie-obsessed humans