Movie reviews 41 results
3.5Score

Norman finds second Gere

Movie review: Norman Taking on the role of a New York fixer in Joseph Cedar's modern iteration of the 'Court Jew' archetype, Richard Gere proves he's capable of suppressing his sexiness in service to a worthy, if pathetic, cause

I Am Not Your Negro cuts to root of Strange Fruit

Movie Review/ Streaming/ DVD: I Am Not Your Negro The words of the late James Baldwin provide a searing portrait of race relations in the United States, and prove how little things have changed in the decades since they were written
2Score

Song to Song feels long, off-key

Movie Review: Song to Song Terrence Malick probes the nature of intimacy through a portrait of Austin's music scene, but the existential maestro fails to find the right notes in this hollow solo
3.5Score

Sense of an Ending eludes closure

Movie Review: The Sense of an Ending In the film version of the ambiguous Julian Barnes novel, Jim Broadbent shines as an older man whose quiet life is interrupted by a letter that makes him re-evaluate the past
2.5Score

Kong: Skull Island feels a little empty-headed

Movie Review: Kong - Skull Island The oversized ape makes a spectacular return in this big-budget B-movie that tries to plumb the depths of the American psyche but ends up playing in a muddy puddle
3Score

The Wide River of Gordon Pinsent’s Dreams

Movie Review: The River of My Dreams Documentary about the Canadian actor captures much of his impish charm, but it leaves many questions unanswered about what really makes him tick
4Score

Paterson finds poetry in the everyday

Movie Review: Paterson In Jim Jarmusch's new film, a bus driver named Paterson who lives in Paterson, N.J. — hometown of William Carlos Williams and Alan Ginsberg — sees life as gentle verse
3.5Score

The Founder’s quarter-pounder of thought

Movie review: The Founder The American Dream comes in a convenient package that's ready to eat as John Lee Hancock finds the beef in The McDonald's Empire

John Madden hits home with Miss Sloan

Interview: John Madden on Miss Sloane The director of Shakespeare in Love says casting Jessica Chastain as a shrewd, morally ambiguous D.C. lobbyist was the best way to expose the ugliness of modern politics   By Katherine Monk WHISTLER, BC – John Madden doesn’t want to get bogged down by the F-word: Feminism has so much ancillary luggage, too many awkward hard edges to cram into the narrative anchovy tin called a feature film. Yet, Miss Sloane, the latest film from the Academy Award-nominated director of Shakespeare in Love points a laser beam at the modern female experience. A D.C.-set (Toronto-shot) thriller starring Jessica Chastain as the title character, Miss Sloane offers a close-up view of the lobbyist’s reality. Watching from a slightly distanced perspective, the viewer picks up the trail of professional lobbyist Elizabeth Sloane just as she embarks on a career move that will change her life forever. Madden was reluctant to give away too many details ...
5Score

Arrival proves mind-altering

Movie review: Arrival Denis Villeneuve's latest may look like a simple first-contact story, but it goes much deeper as it questions the linear nature of time and the role of language