Movie 12 results
4Score

Columbus Is Like Waltzing to Light

#VIFF17 Movie Review - Columbus Director Kogonada creates an unassuming art film that frames the details of the human condition against a backdrop of midcentury architectural masterpieces
2.5Score

Mummy Mia!

Movie Review: The Mummy Tom Cruise tosses himself across the screen as a treasure-hunting soldier who stumbles into a cursed sarcophagus carrying an ancient queen with a score to settle
3.5Score

Arthritis and Adamantium: Logan senses an ending

Movie Review: Logan movie review James Mangold's latest instalment in the X-Men franchise takes a heroic look at mortality via Hugh Jackman's aging Wolverine and Patrick Stewart's supernaturally demented Professor Xavier
4Score

Lion has a big roar

Movie review: Lion The true story of Saroo Brierley's quest for his ancestral home finds an epic scale through intimate, emotionally compelling scenes and standout performances from a top-notch ensemble

Tatiana Maslany, Tom Cullen fire up first-timer

Interview: Joey Klein on The Other Half In a world full of malaise, misanthropy and unmitigated sorrow, first-time filmmaker Joey Klein says he wants to hold up a funhouse mirror to ambient pain By Katherine Monk (November 30, 2016) Joey Klein is what you’d call a ‘late bloomer.’ When he was a kid growing up in Montreal, he assumed he’d become a doctor like his father. He ended up in McGill management school instead, and hated it. So he headed to New York City at the age of 25 to study acting, a career he pursued with success, landing roles in American Gangster and 12 Monkeys -- to name a few. Yet, he craved a bigger challenge still. He had a hankering to address the ambient angst of modern experience – without exploiting Hollywood trope – so he started writing. And now, just a year shy of his 40th birthday, he's making his directorial debut with the theatrical release of The Other Half. “Originally, it was a story about grief… and about grief over time. ...

Life, death and Andrew Huculiak

People: Interview with Andrew Huculiak Getting metaphysical with the first-time director of Violent means dipping a big toe into the cold, dark waters of existentialism and cozying up with Kierkegaard By Katherine Monk (October 19, 2016) VANCOUVER – A gentle drizzle falls outside, and the faint smell of woolly dampness mingles with the scent of fresh pie. It’s a typical fall day in Vancouver -- wet, dark, and cool -- the perfect backdrop for an interview with Andrew Huculiak. Huculiak is the director behind Violent, easily one of the best first features in Canadian film history, but up until now, it was also one of the most difficult to access. Shot two years ago in Norway with a unilingual Norwegian cast, Violent was invited to Cannes, picked up top prizes at The Vancouver International Film Festival and was shortlisted as Canada’s best foreign film Oscar submission. By all accounts and measures, it should have hit theatres nationwide. Yet, it’s only now, two ...
4Score

Violent finds eerie beauty in the abyss

Movie review: Violent Andrew Huculiak's debut feature is a stunning mediation on the meaning of life that owes as much to Alfred Hitchcock as it does to Terrence Malick in its bid to open our eyes to existence
4Score

Honest emotion makes Gleason a must-see

Movie review: Gleason Sports movies demand a whole lot of heart, but this documentary about a former NFL'er diagnosed with ALS captures the whole body of the human experience
3.5Score

A direct hit to the head of the NFL

Movie review: Concussion Thanks to a cast that's just as comfortable with comedy as drama, Peter Landesman's forensic examination of the NFL's inaction on head injuries is more than a preachy lesson in institutional denial, it's a gentle testament to the importance of human compassion  
4Score

Doom and ROOM

Movie review: ROOM Irish director Lenny Abrahamson uses carefully constructed frames to bring Emma Donoghue's story of confinement to the big screen, finding concrete results with a careful pour of emotion and a gifted young talent