Rachel Weisz 7 results
3Score

Disobedience is an uncertain love story

Movie Review: Disobedience An art photographer and an Orthodox Jewish wife re-ignite a forbidden passion in a romance that never quite finds its footing
4Score

My Cousin Rachel Cinches Blood Ties

Movie Review: My Cousin Rachel Rachel Weisz performs a dance of several veils as Roger Michell revisits Victorian archetype through a psychologically modern lens

Seeking inspiration in the Big Smoke

#TIFF 16: Critic's Dispatches Damien Chazelle's La La Land offers a deep breath filled with human notes in an urban landscape where the creative urge is often filtered and conditioned for comfort By Katherine Monk TORONTO — The condo tower I’m staying at affords me a view of downtown Toronto’s rooftops: squares and rectangles carving their way into the horizontal blue line of Lake Ontario. Sheer glass and steel boxes topped with trailing steel tubes that allow sealed office buildings to breathe. Inspiration, mechanized. It’s a necessity in an urban landscape that denies human scale, and emotionally speaking, all things human. But I didn’t even notice the ambient drone of a thousand HVAC fans whirring away over the Big Smoke until today — until I saw Damien Chazelle’s La La Land and rediscovered what true inspiration really feels like: A deep breath exhaled as song. Sure, La La Land had already been touted as the big buzz movie at this year’s Toronto ...
2.5Score

The Heaviness Between Oceans

Movie review:  The Light Between Oceans Derek Cianfrance makes another stab at melancholy-laced romance with his adaptation of M.L. Stedman's period novel about a lighthouse keeper and his failure to navigate a moral hazard
2.5Score

Movie review: The Lobster shows its claws

This surreal (and possibly brilliant satire) — in which a group of single people must find mates or be turned into animals — is more creepy than funny  

Ten Sundance titles that tweak our critical antenna

Film: The 2016 Sundance Film Festival This year's festival includes a testament to Kristen Stewart's continuing career in art house cinema, Don Cheadle tooting his own horn as Miles Davis and one movie about a wiener dog, and another about a dog named Weiner. By Katherine Monk The festival kicks off in earnest later today with Robert Redford's annual press conference, but before the press corps gets pressed together and becomes a blurb-spouting Borg, I made a list of ten standout titles that may, or may not, get mileage when it's all over: Captain Fantastic: Viggo Mortensen plays a father who’s raised six kids off the grid, and — for reasons as yet unknown — is forced to plug back in the world he left behind. Certain Women: Kelly Reichardt is a true independent who embodies the Sundance ethos, and she returns with Certain Women, an adaptation of Maile Meloy’s short stories that stars Michelle Williams, Laura Dern, Kristen Stewart and Lily Gladstone. Complete ...
2.5Score

Youth ages the viewer via affectation

Movie review: Youth Paolo Sorrentino's follow-up to The Great Beauty feels like opera sung in English: Pretentious, puffy and frequently plain stupid