Movies 635 results

Jay Stone and Katherine Monk movie reviews and profiles. Movies new to streaming / DVD.
Reviews of Canadian movies and filmmaker profiles by Katherine Monk and Jay Stone.

3.5Score

Review: Joker chokes on sympathy for the devil

Movie review: Joker Joaquin Phoenix soars as a latter-day Satan in Todd Phillips's Joker, a rewrite of Paradise Lost for a generation weaned on comic books, social media and selfies.
3.5Score

Review: Judy burns Garland’s ghost at the stake for sizzle’s sake

Movie review: Judy Director Rupert Goold turns Judy Garland’s final act into a passion play that focuses on suffering and female martyrdom. It’s a sad descent redeemed by Renée Zellweger’s unfamiliar face and fleeting hints at humour.  
2.5Score

Review: Abominable gets lost in a blizzard of déja-vu

Movie review: Abominable Dreamworks animators substitute a yeti for Lassie and E.T. in a story of finding home that feels far too familiar, and serves up a central character that looks and feels factory-made.
4Score

Review: Ad Astra explores the emptiness of the masculine ideal

Movie review: Ad Astra James Gray probes the hero myth through a father-son story that casts Brad Pitt and Tommy Lee Jones as strangers trying to find a meaningful connection in the existential void.
3.5Score

Review: Downton Abbey’s fairy tale continues to fester

Movie Review: Downton Abbey Julian Fellowes created a perfect little universe inside a crystal ball, then filled it with the suggestion of outside elements — a pinch of painted sand and glitter that he can agitate to conjure a snowstorm of conflict. The new feature film stays inside the gorgeous snow globe as a Royal Visit shakes up the Crawley family, and sets the stage for the next century -- as well as a continuing film franchise.

Movie review: Honeyland is a parable of capitalism

Documentary about a beekeeper in Macedonia takes an intimate look at what happens when neighbours move in and see the profits that can be made

Tiff 2019 finds its controversy in Jojo Rabbit

A young boy in Nazi Germany turns for moral guidance to a fantasy figure of Adolf Hitler in this satire that has sharply divided critics By Jay Stone   TORONTO — Film festivals need movies that people can argue about, and the Toronto film festival has been blessed with a good one: Jojo Rabbit, a comedy set in Nazi Germany. Some people, including half of the representatives of Ex-Press.com, argue that it’s juvenile, and in bad taste, and — worst of all — not funny. Others, including the other half of Ex-Press.com staff, think it’s bold, original and filled with laughs.   And we’re not the only ones. The aggregate site Rotten Tomatoes gives it a favourable rating in the 70s, but the opinions are wildly divergent, from raves (“a triumph. A film of sophisticated brilliance and humour:” Jason Gorber, HighDef Digest) to pans (“conventional, lazy and incredibly irresponsible filmmaking:” Jordan Ruimy, World of Reel.)   Personally, I ...
3Score

The Goldfinch fails to adapt but Donna Tartt’s DNA survives

Movies: #TIFF19 - The Goldfinch The Pulitzer Prize-winning novel about survival divided audiences in print form as it fragmented in the final act. John Crowley’s visually satisfying, but dramatically disappointing, movie version falls prey to the same problems in its bid to fit too much into the frame.
3Score

Hustlers strips systemic sexism down to the boner

#TIFF19: Hustlers Movie Review A team of smart pole dancers fleeced the wolves of Wall Street by exploiting their natural resources, but this female revenge story based on a New York magazine piece doesn’t grab at easy conclusions. Director Lorene Scafaria teases out the hard reality of gender inequality, one lap dance at a time.

The movies of TIFF 2019, but not all of them

You don't always get to see a whole movie at a film festival, but sometimes what you do see is enough, Jay Stone discovers By Jay Stone   TORONTO — Another thing that happens at film festivals is that you don’t see a whole movie because maybe you had to leave to get to another theatre for an even more important film, or because it’s late and you have to get some sleep or you’ll pass out, or because it’s late and you do pass out right there in the cinema and the nice lady next to you has to poke you in the ribs because it turns out you were snoring. You can actually follow a movie this way — often you hear enough dialogue that you dream it — unless it’s a foreign film, in which case you jerk yourself awake and you’re not sure where you are and it takes a few seconds for your eyes to focus enough to read the subtitles.   This is part of the reason that professional film criticism is a young person’s game, or at least an awake person’s ...