Jay Stone 49 results

Jay Stone has been a fixture in Canadian media for decades, and one of the most beloved movie critics in the country. He worked at the Ottawa Citizen and Postmedia News service until he retired.

4Score

I Am Not Your Negro cuts to root of Strange Fruit

Movie Review/ Streaming/ DVD: I Am Not Your Negro The words of the late James Baldwin provide a searing portrait of race relations in the United States, and prove how little things have changed in the decades since they were written
3.5Score

Sense of an Ending eludes closure

Movie Review: The Sense of an Ending In the film version of the ambiguous Julian Barnes novel, Jim Broadbent shines as an older man whose quiet life is interrupted by a letter that makes him re-evaluate the past
3Score

The Wide River of Gordon Pinsent’s Dreams

Movie Review: The River of My Dreams Documentary about the Canadian actor captures much of his impish charm, but it leaves many questions unanswered about what really makes him tick
4Score

Paterson finds poetry in the everyday

Movie Review: Paterson In Jim Jarmusch's new film, a bus driver named Paterson who lives in Paterson, N.J. — hometown of William Carlos Williams and Alan Ginsberg — sees life as gentle verse

Mike Mills’s 20th Century Women a wise comedy

Movie Review: 20th Century Women A teenage boy in 1970s California is raised by three women at different stages of their lives in a coming-of-age story with a loopy feminist edge
4.5Score

La La Land is where love and art tangle

Movie review: La La Land This musical love letter to the movie business, jazz and romance is an intoxicating throwback to the days of dancing among the stars and singing your heart out in the hopes of making it  
3Score

Movie review: Miss Sloane is a murky thriller

Jessica Chastain is compelling to watch, but this story of  a morally ambiguous lobbyist in Washington is both narratively preposterous and emotionally incoherent  

Between the lines: Delicate tragedy of Manchester by the Sea

Interview: Kenneth Lonergan on Manchester by the Sea Kenneth Lonergan makes a triumphant return to movies with a story about a solitary man who must go back home to face his family and the events that changed his life By Jay Stone TORONTO — There’s a scene in the penetrating and devastating drama Manchester by the Sea where Casey Affleck, playing a loner with a crippling secret in his past, stands in front of a burning building. It’s defining tragedy in the film: the Affleck character, named Lee, has just been to the grocery store to buy some 2 a.m. snacks and beer, and he has returned to find his life going up in flames. It’s the kind of moment that would call — in a lesser film — for a lot of outsized emotions. But Manchester by the Sea is too quiet and controlled for that: it’s written and directed by Kenneth Lonergan, a master of understated sadness, and has in Affleck a leading man whose own work (he’s the younger, less famous brother of Ben) reflects a ...
2.5Score

Elle and the politics of rape

Movie Review: Elle Paul Verhoeven's provocation gives Isabelle Huppert a difficult and complex role, but the movie itself is a confused series of disturbing incidents about the meaning of sexual assault

Leonard Cohen and me: A reminiscence

By Jay Stone   Even if we stated our case very clearly and all those who held as we do came to our side, all of them, we would still be very few. -- Leonard Cohen, Parasites of Heaven When he died last week his constituency emerged, thousands, millions perhaps, smitten, devoted, some with stories of how they had gone to his house in Montreal and he had made them egg salad sandwiches. He was gracious, modest, haunting, and with the key to something we thought was ours alone. “Have you ever noticed how private a wet tree is, a curtain of razor blades?,” he wrote (in A Cross Didn’t Fall On Me), and suddenly you did notice. A poem is something that everyone knows but no one ever said before. I found him by accident. When I was a teenager, there was a copy of his first novel, The Favourite Game, on the bookshelf in my father’s den when we lived in north Toronto. I don’t know how it got there, but my father got a lot of books from publishers because he was on the ...