Katherine Monk 147 results

Katherine Monk is a former movie critic with The Vancouver Sun and Postmedia News. She still watches a lot of movies… and writes stuff about them.

2Score

Dunkirk Doesn’t Work

Movie Review: Dunkirk Christopher Nolan's war movie about the 'miracle' at Dunkirk fights itself on the beaches, in the air and on the seas; it never surrenders a strand of storyline in its desire to go big.  

David Lowery Defeated Nihilism with A Ghost Story

People: Interview with David Lowery His art-house horror hybrid starring Casey Affleck and Rooney Mara is the biggest buzz title of the summer, but David Lowery says he's still figuring out what his movie about ghosts, secret notes and hidden meanings is all about. By Katherine Monk David Lowery has been talking about A Ghost Story since January, when it premiered at The Sundance Film Festival. But by year’s end, there’s a good chance everyone will be talking about this low-budget art-house-horror hybrid starring Rooney Mara, Casey Affleck and a ghost walking around under a sheet with two cut-out eyeholes. Yes, indeed, A Ghost Story is haunting. It wakes the ache that’s always there. Yet, in his bid to dig a little deeper into a single image of a ghost sitting in an empty house, Lowery successfully pulls a long sliver from the calloused sole of the Zeitgeist. He also made a few therapeutic discoveries of his own. The Ex-Press spoke to Lowery, the 36-year-old Texas-raised ...
4Score

Spider-Man: Homecoming Strips the Serious from Comicverse

Movie Review: Spider-Man - Homecoming Tom Holland and director Jon Watts prove there's still room for 'comic' in the comic book universe as they return to basics in the highly entertaining Spider-Man: Homecoming
4Score

The Big Sick Proves a Salve to the Soul

Movie Review: The Big Sick Rom-com meets Romeo and Juliet in Kumail Nanjiani's truth-inspired story that follows our lovesick hero down hospital corridors to face life, death and family

Trish Dolman directs the national selfie: Canada in a Day

Interview: Trish Dolman Vancouver filmmaker Trish Dolman captures Canadian soul in crowd-sourced documentary portrait airing tonight on CTV By Katherine Monk (July 1, 2017) VANCOUVER — There is something extraordinarily moving about Canada in a Day, even though one might say it’s thoroughly ordinary. A visual scrapbook pulled together from over 16,000 video submissions from average Canucks who pointed the camera at their own lives on September 10, 2016, this selfie collage isn’t a film made by the rich and famous. It wasn’t scripted, and contains no professional actors. Yet, there is drama. There’s a palpable sense of theme. And despite the diversity of the players and their unique messages, one even feels a sense of unity. A shared heartbeat echoing empathy and human understanding. It’s lurking in every frame, because it’s part of who we are as a people. It’s also because of Trish Dolman, the Vancouver-based producer and director who took on the challe...
4Score

The Beguiled Seduces with Mood

Movie Review: The Beguiled Sofia Coppola revisits a Civil War sex drama to undress gender differences as she casts Colin Farrell as a 'the corporal' in this elegant dissection of desire
4Score

Baby Driver Revs Millennial Muscle

Movie Review: Baby Driver Ansel Elgort takes the wheel for a generation as Baby, a brilliant getaway driver looking to recapture a bit of the past in Edgar Wright's seductive, three-ply retread
2.5Score

47 Meters Down Too Shallow

Movie review: 47 Meters Down Mandy Moore and Claire Holt play potential shark chum in another girl-versus-shark showdown that makes us care more about sharks than selfie-obsessed humans
3Score

The Bad Batch Takes its Pound of Flesh

Movie Review: The Bad Batch Ana Lily Amirpour's darkly comic dystopian nightmare uses cannibalism as effective social satire as we watch Suki Waterhouse do her best to remain whole in a world where redemption costs an arm and a leg
2Score

About Last Knight: New Transformers movie is loud, long, and leaks oil

Movie Review: Transformers - The Last Knight Michael Bay's fifth Transformers monstrosity features the ever-charming Mark Wahlberg kicking mechanical can down the curb once more in a messy collision of story, character and Saturday morning merchandizing