Horror 11 results
3Score

Halloween gets all dressed up as the original but has nowhere to go

Movie review: Halloween David Gordon Green’s ambitious reset of the Halloween franchise showcases a badass Jamie Lee Curtis as trauma survivor Laurie Strode, but for some stupid reason, fails to exploit the post-menopausal character with an axe to grind and a villain to kill.
3Score

Goosebumps 2 almost too scary

Movie review: Goosebumps 2 - Haunted Halloween Jack Black returns as R.L. Stine and turns Goosebumps’ Haunted Halloween into a meta horror movie for young adults, but with an evil ventriloquist dummy as the villain and a scene that compromises Mom’s goodness, even grown-ups may get the shivers.
3.5Score

Unsane Gets Under the Membrane

Movie review: Unsane Steven Soderbergh brings a fisheye lens and a personality experiment to a thriller set in a psychiatric  centre, where Claire Foy checks her crown for a hospital gown as Sawyer Valentini, an unwilling patient who believes her stalker is to blame.
4Score

A Ghost Story Wears a Sheet, and Still Sneaks Up On You

Movie Review: A Ghost Story This meditation on grief, loss and time is told in a simple but effective story in which the dead spirit is represented by a sheet with two eye holes

David Lowery Defeated Nihilism with A Ghost Story

People: Interview with David Lowery His art-house horror hybrid starring Casey Affleck and Rooney Mara is the biggest buzz title of the summer, but David Lowery says he's still figuring out what his movie about ghosts, secret notes and hidden meanings is all about. By Katherine Monk David Lowery has been talking about A Ghost Story since January, when it premiered at The Sundance Film Festival. But by year’s end, there’s a good chance everyone will be talking about this low-budget art-house-horror hybrid starring Rooney Mara, Casey Affleck and a ghost walking around under a sheet with two cut-out eyeholes. Yes, indeed, A Ghost Story is haunting. It wakes the ache that’s always there. Yet, in his bid to dig a little deeper into a single image of a ghost sitting in an empty house, Lowery successfully pulls a long sliver from the calloused sole of the Zeitgeist. He also made a few therapeutic discoveries of his own. The Ex-Press spoke to Lowery, the 36-year-old Texas-raised ...
2.5Score

47 Meters Down Too Shallow

Movie review: 47 Meters Down Mandy Moore and Claire Holt play potential shark chum in another girl-versus-shark showdown that makes us care more about sharks than selfie-obsessed humans
2.5Score

Mummy Mia!

Movie Review: The Mummy Tom Cruise tosses himself across the screen as a treasure-hunting soldier who stumbles into a cursed sarcophagus carrying an ancient queen with a score to settle

Ed Gass-Donnelly hides a message up his sleeve

#VIFF16: Interview with Ed Gass-Donnelly The Toronto-based director takes a pry bar to the basement door of family secrets in Lavender, a psychological thriller starring Abbie Cornish, Dermot Mulroney and Justin Long   By Katherine Monk VANCOUVER – The man who made The Last Exorcism Part II is marked. Ed Gass-Donnelly rolls up his right sleeve in the firelight, and reveals two words written in deep indigo capital letters: “Find Beauty.” “I’m not doing this to pay the bills,” says the Toronto-born director of Lavender, a psychological thriller unspooling at the Vancouver International Film Festival this week as part of the Altered States program. “I have to remind myself of that… after making [The Last Exorcism Part II] I think I found new perspective,” he says, sitting back in a leather couch at the Sutton Place lounge. “I appreciated the experience of coming out on 3000 screens. It was like ‘WOW!’ – 3000 screens at once is what you ...
2Score

The Forest gets lost walking in circles

Movie review: The Forest Natalie Dormer takes a long walk in a forest full of strange fruit in Jason Zada's Japanese take on Little Red Riding Hood  
2Score

Movie review: The Green Inferno

Eli Roth's new movie screams "Eat me" There's more to horror than dismemberment, cannibalism and gory plane crashes, but the director of the Hostel series remains oblivious to the emotional needs of horror, and the whole concept of acting